Food

Human Foods That Are Safe to Feed Cats

Humans often like to share treats with their kitties, including some of their food. The problem is that some food that’s safe for humans is not… Trista - December 16, 2018

Humans often like to share treats with their kitties, including some of their food. The problem is that some food that’s safe for humans is not safe for cats. Cats have different nutritional needs than humans, and even some foods your cat loves might wreak havoc on their digestive system. This awareness has discouraged many cat lovers from giving their kitties any “people” food. Humans are omnivores, and cats are classified as obligate carnivores. That is a special class of meat-eater that has come to rely on a diet of meat only. Some human foods are safe for cats to eat.

Cats derive their energy from protein, not carbohydrates. Unlike humans, cats don’t need to eat vegetables, although some cats will chomp on plants now and then to get a bit of roughage. Once you find out which foods they can eat, you can feel free to share your food with them now and then. Alternatively, you can make some delicious treats for them. An average cat needs about 200 to 250 calories a day, and snacks should make up no more than 20 calories a day. Moderation is essential when feeding your cat human food. Here are 40 foods you can safely feed your feline friend.

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40. Avocados 

Avocados are all the rage right now; you have probably seen many avocado pieces of toast and avocado pictures used as a topping to many popular dishes. Avocado is very high in fat, and you often see it as a staple to a ketogenic diet. Avocado is okay for cats to eat, but only in tiny quantities. If cats eat a large amount of avocado, it can be deadly – so give this to your cat as a treat at your own discretion, or ask your veterinarian first to be on the safe side. Avocados are packed with vitamins and minerals that can be healthy for your cat.

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Avocados are full of vitamins A, C, E, and B6. All of these vitamins can aid in your cat’s overall health, and it will immensely help their coat be shiny and help if they have dry skin. It is only okay to give your cats small amounts of avocado and should only be done seldom. Avocados are full of healthy fats and amino acids, which are great for their diet. Make sure only to give your cat the avocado flesh as well – do not feed your cat avocado skin or the avocado pit. If you don’t like it, then neither will your cat!

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39. Cabbage 

Cabbage has a bit of a bad name as being a not great tasting vegetable and being bland. However, cabbage is in many different recipes and comes in several colors, adding vibrant colors to your dishes. Cabbage is high in vitamin C and vitamin K and a low-calorie vegetable, making it a great addition to your diet and your cat’s diet. They are also a good source of fiber, which can be beneficial to you and your cat as well. As cats are carnivores, they don’t need any vegetables in their diet, so cabbage should only be fed to cats in small amounts.

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You can feed your cat both regular cabbage and red cabbage. Both need to be cooked before you provide cabbage to your cat to aid in digestion. Cabbage should be cut up into small pieces, no larger than the size of their kibble. You can mix cabbage in with their kibble if cooked, and it will be a nice treat for them. Large amounts of cabbage can be harmful to your cat and shouldn’t be fed to your cat in large amounts as their main diet is just meats. Be sure to monitor your cats while giving them cabbage.

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38. Raspberries

Here is an excellent snack for humans and cats. Raspberries, like other berries, are packed full of nutrients and vitamins. Raspberries are high in vitamin C and full of antioxidants, which makes them a superfood for humans. Cats can benefit from these superfoods and may not get the same benefit as raspberries are not part of their regular diet. Even with this in mind, it is not harmful to give your cats raspberries as a treat. You can provide your cats fresh or frozen raspberries, too, as long as they are in bite-size pieces. 

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While it is safe to give your cats these raspberry treats, they should never get them daily or part of their regular diet. With their diet being mostly meat, this treat should be limited to 1-2 raspberries, only a couple of times a month. Do not feed your cats raspberries every day as this could upset their natural diet and make them sick because of the lack of their regular meat-filled diet. It is also not good to give raspberries to your cat very often as raspberries do have much natural sugar in them, which should be limited.

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37. Cauliflower 

Cauliflower is another food that has become very popular recently, with people following a ketogenic lifestyle. This vegetable is being made into bread and doughs. Cut it small to replace rice, and just eaten regularly, such as steamed or roasted. It is a low-carb option packed with vitamin C, is high in fiber, and is an excellent antioxidant source. Usually, only the head is eaten of the cauliflower with the stems and leaves being disposed of. Cats can enjoy this low-carb food like their human pet owners, but in much smaller quantities and not nearly as often. 

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Cats can have small bits and cauliflower pieces, but the stems and leaves should be avoided and not eaten. Cauliflower should be cooked for your cat, as it will be easier to digest. Cauliflower is a good treat for your cat as it is high in fiber, which will aid in digestion, and it is also rich in antioxidants. With it being high in antioxidants, this may help with inflammation in your cat, which is great for older cats struggling with arthritis. It is best to cut this food up small, and it’s not good to give this to your cat often. 

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36. Cucumbers 

Cucumbers are one of those foods that most people think is a vegetable, but it is a fruit. This low-calorie food is a great snack for anyone who wants to lose weight, and it is also a great snack for your cat. Cucumbers have a high water content, so they are a great snack to keep you hydrated while giving you that satisfying crunch as well. Cucumbers grow on a vine-like plant and are very easy to grow if you live in a warmer climate. They are also reasonably cheap if you don’t have a green thumb. 

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Cats are okay to eat cucumbers, and they can have a number is positive health benefits from eating cucumbers. Cats don’t usually drink very much water, so with cucumbers having such a high water content, eating cucumbers will ensure your feline friend stays hydrated. However, it is best to keep the cucumbers to a minimum, resulting in diarrhea because of the high water content. Everything in moderation for our feline friends and cucumbers is no exception. Cucumbers are fine raw, but as we know, pickles are cucumbers as well, and it is not recommended to feed you cat pickles.

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35. Green Beans 

Green beans are a fantastic low calorie, crunchy snack that will surely satisfy your cravings for a crunchy snack. They are great raw or cooked and are a great source of vitamin C and fiber. Some people may find that green beans are harder on their digestive system, and that is because of certain minerals found in green beans, but merely cooking your green beans should aid in your digestion. The good news is there are tons of recipes for cooked beans, so you can find a way you like them. Cats are perfectly safe eating green beans, and their fiber content can be beneficial. 

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Cats should not have any green beans that you have seasoned or added anything to. If cats are going to have green bean beans, it is a good idea to cook them first, but they can have them raw. Green beans have a decent protein content, so they are a good snack option for a dieting cat. With its fiber content as well, this low-calorie treat is much better than some store-bought options. It should not replace any of your cat’s regular diet, but a small amount given as a treat is perfectly safe. 

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34. Strawberries

Strawberries are probably one of the most popular berries in North America, and it is one of the healthiest fruits you can consume period. It is an everyday staple in most smoothie recipes and can be enjoyed during any meal or snack. Strawberries are high in antioxidants, fiber, and vitamins, making them not only delicious but nutritionally dense as well. However, it does contain a fair amount of natural sugar, so having large quantities may not be the best thing for your diet. Cats can eat strawberries safely as well and can benefit from having strawberries introduced as a snack.

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As strawberries are high in natural sugars, it is best to limit this snack for your cats very seldom. They can benefit from its higher fiber and high antioxidants. However, it is best to keep the strawberries to a minimum overall. When feeding your cat strawberries, it should also be noted that these berries should be cut into smaller pieces. You also need to cut off the stems – the stems are hard to digest, and if they get stuck in your cat’s digestive system, it will be a huge problem and a huge vet bill for you.

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33. Lettuce 

Lettuce and leafy greens should be a part of every human’s diet. Leafy greens are essential for our overall health and weight management. Lettuce is very low in calories – that is why so many diets consist of salads because you can eat so much of it, keeping full for longer while not piling on the calories. It is also great for wraps, sandwiches, and many other recipes. Lettuce is a good source of fiber and iron as well, which will aid in your digestion. Lettuce is a good that is safe for cats, with a few exceptions. 

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Cats can eat most lettuce types; however, it is not recommended for cats to eat much iceberg lettuce. Iceberg lettuce has a very high water content, which can lead to your cat having diarrhea. It is also not good to eat any leafy part of an onion, which can be fatal to cats. With other lettuce types still having a higher water content, it’s always great for your cats to consume this in moderation. It should be cut into small pieces for your cat and not given as a replacement for any of their regular diet food. 

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32. Potatoes

Potatoes are probably one of the most consumed vegetables in North America when you think about it. You can have them as fries, mashed potatoes, baked potatoes, soups, roasted, and more. They are served with most meals, especially in fast-food restaurants. This starchy vegetable is rich in vitamins and minerals. It does have a bad reputation for being an unhealthy food because of being very high in carbohydrates. While it is true that they are high in carbohydrates, this doesn’t mean that they are overall harmful. They can be part of a balanced diet easily and can be enjoyed in moderation. They are safe for cats to eat, and you can give your feline pieces of potato when you are cooking them.

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Lots of pet foods for dogs and cats have potatoes in their recipes. If there is grain-free pet food, they will often have potatoes instead, as it is an excellent binding agent. Cats and dogs can digest potatoes finely, but they don’t need it as part of their diet. They can use the carbohydrates as quick energy, but it’s not necessarily beneficial other than the vitamins and minerals they would get. It is best to give potatoes to your cat cooked, not too often, and cut into manageable bite-sized pieces.

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31. Tomatoes 

Tomatoes are another food that most people think is a vegetable, but it is a fruit. This bright red fruit is the base for many of our favorite foods – pizza sauce, spaghetti, chili, etc. Tomatoes contain a lot of vitamin B and E and also have a fair amount of potassium. Tomatoes are a low-calorie option so that they can be added to many recipes with no guilt. There are many different types of tomatoes, so the question of are they good for cats depends on the tomato in the end. There isn’t a simple answer. 

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Being safe for cats is both yes and no. Parts of the tomato can be safe for cats, while other parts are a big no-no. Do not ever let your cats eat the stems of tomatoes, the leaves, or the seeds. Cats can eat different parts of tomatoes in tiny amounts. Some tomatoes are more acidic than others, so if you are going to be feeding your cat certain types of tomatoes, you will need to keep an eye on them for any changes in their health. It is best to keep tomatoes to a minimum, but in the end, they are safe.

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30. Salmon

Salmon is an excellent source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids for humans. The great news is that it is just as healthy for cats. It is a nutritious treat your cat will love, and you can freely share it without worrying about the consequences. Commercial cat foods may even contain salmon as it is such a good source of nutrients. Have a look at some of your cat’s wet or dry food – if it is a seafood-based product, it could have salmon in it already! Many foods will mix different kinds of seafood into one recipe, so it is good to read the labels on your cat’s food.

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When feeding your cat salmon, you do need to take a few precautions. Ensure the salmon is cooked because raw salmon could make your cat ill due to harmful bacteria or parasites. Don’t share your sushi! It’s also essential to make sure any bones are removed, or they could get stuck in your pet’s throat and cause choking. Remember, too, that salmon is rich, and you should limit portion sizes to prevent your cat from overindulging. It is a good idea to start with just a small size – 1-2 pieces the size of their kibble as a treat. Smaller pieces will be safer.

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29. Eggs

Cooked eggs offer your cat a good source of protein and B vitamins. On the other hand, raw eggs may contain bacteria, so you should not feed them to your cat. It is not exactly recommended to eat raw eggs as humans, so that might be a rule of thumb to keep in mind for your cat as well. Unless your pet is allergic to eggs, it’s perfectly fine for it to eat cooked eggs. Eggs are very nutritious, but they do not provide your cat with complete, well-balanced nutrition. If you fed your cat nothing but eggs, it would develop nutritional deficiencies.

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If you’re eating an omelet, there’s no problem in sharing a little with your cat as long as you haven’t added onions or garlic. Cats should be fed eggs in moderation, and this does not mean one egg a day – which is equivalent to about eight eggs for a person. Your cat will probably love sharing your breakfast with you, but this should be an occasional treat. If you have dropped a tiny piece of the floor that is cooked, there is no harm in letting your female friend eat that up. Try putting small bites in their bowl – only a few.

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28. Chicken

Cats are meat-eaters, and they need a diet high in protein to be healthy. They love eating chicken, and it’s a healthy, safe protein for them. Chicken breasts are best because they contain the least fat. You can often add chicken to cat food formulas, and remember: you can’t go wrong with sharing chicken with your feline friend. Make sure it’s well cooked, in any case. Remove any bones because they can splinter easily and get stuck in the throat, or the sharp splinters may damage the digestive tract. It may be best to purchase boneless, skinless chicken breast – or only give that as a treat when your cooking chicken and avoid other cuts.

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If a chicken has been cooked with hot spice, it may not be suitable for your cat. Keep it bland and remove any fat and skin. If your cat suffers from diarrhea, offer your kitty a small bowl of boiled chicken and rice instead of cat food and continue with this until diarrhea passes. Always use an unseasoned chicken breast to be safe – with the remaining meat (you only want to give a small part of the chicken to your cat), you could make soups and chop up the chicken in a salad for yourself. Don’t let the rest go to waste!

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27. Banana

Bananas are one of the most popular fruits in North America, as it is sweet and easy to eat. A banana may seem like a strange choice for a cat treat, but it is okay to give it to them. If your cat loves bananas, there’s no harm in feeding it a piece or two now and then. The potassium in bananas is as good for cats as it is for humans, and it’s also high in fiber, which will keep your pet’s digestive system healthy. It also contains vitamin B6, which has a positive effect on the nervous system and inflammation.

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However, bananas are full of carbohydrates. Something cats do not need. Cats can digest them, but they should only make up a minimal part of their diet. Eating too many banana snacks is unhealthy for your cat and can cause health problems. Keep in mind that this is not really appropriate food for felines, and it would probably be better to stick to a meat-based treat. Did your cat happen to catch a piece that has fallen on the floor? Limit it to that lucky accident for your cat. Though it is safe – it is better not to make this treat a habit at all.

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26. Oatmeal

Oatmeal is alright for you and safe for your cat. Your cat may benefit from a little bit of oatmeal, but as an obligate carnivore, most of its diet should be animal protein. It cannot survive on oatmeal alone. Adding a little oatmeal to your cat’s diet will contribute to iron, vitamin B6, and calcium. If you are making your oatmeal and adding sugar to it, it is best not to give this to your cat. Plain oatmeal would be the only time you would give any of this to your cat – and like most other treats should be a minimal amount.

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Some cats love oatmeal; others don’t like it at all. If you want to give your cat oatmeal, introduce it slowly. You can add some blueberries to the oatmeal for taste – don’t add raisins or grapes as these are toxic to cats. Oatmeal is full of carbohydrates and does not contain the amount of protein found in animal products. For this reason, you should not use oatmeal as a main meal but as a supplement to its cat food. Sometimes oatmeal or other grains are used as a filler product in foods – so keep this in mind when giving your cat oatmeal.

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25. Cheese

Cheese is healthy for humans and cats unless they are lactose intolerant. If you want to feed your cat some cheese, try out a minimal amount first to see how the digestive system handles it. Once you have given your cat any cheese – keep an eye on their stool when you clean their litter box. If you notice anything unusual, stop giving them any cheese immediately. Like brie, soft cheeses are often higher in lactose, so stick to the hard cheeses, like cheddar. Cheddar is a good source of protein and calcium and is more common in most households.

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Too much cheese is not suitable for your cat, especially cheeses full of fat and salt. Cheese is not as good a protein source like meat, and portion control is crucial when feeding your cat cheese. If you only give cheese occasionally to your cat as a special treat, you may be able to use it to get them to ingest medicine. Some cat owners grind up pills and put the powder in cheese to get their cats to take it. An excellent way to give cats a cheese treat is when your shredding cheese – give them one or two pieces of the small shredded pieces.

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24. Bread

Bread is another food you can safely feed your cat. As long as the bread is baked correctly and does not contain yeast in its raw state, it can provide your cat with some fiber and nutrients. Never give your cat raw dough because it will continue to rise in its stomach and digestive tract, and that can have serious consequences. If you have dough rising on your counter, make sure to keep it away from your cat. Usually, you place a towel over bowls with the rising dough in them. However, also keep an eye on your cat when they are in the kitchen.

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If you feed your cat bread, stick to whole grain bread and avoid any bread that contains garlic or onion in any form. Too much bread is not a good idea, as your cat does not need all the carbohydrates. Consuming too many carbs does not leave room for the protein’s diet and fat felines need. As long as your cat is healthy and has a lean body weight, a little bit of bread on occasion won’t cause problems. Something like the last tiny bit of crust that doesn’t have any toppings on it or pieces that have fallen off when cutting any bread would be a nice small treat.

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23. Apples

Apples are safe for your pet as long as you remove the seeds and skin. The seeds in the apple’s core contain cyanogenic glycoside (cyanide), which is very harmful to them. The skin may contain pesticides, which are also dangerous. The skin is totally fine for human consumption, so your cat may need to wait while you enjoy your fruity treat first. You can safely feed your cat the flesh of the apple, and it’s a good source of vitamin C and fiber. Ensuring you are cutting the pieces up small – about the size of their kibble would be a useful reference.

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Don’t give your cat too much apple at once, as this can cause an upset stomach. Cooked, mashed apples are excellent for your cat unless they are full of spice. Some spices will make your cat ill. Apples soaked in sugary sauces are also not a good idea as the sugar content is too high. With this in mind, it is not recommended to give your cat pieces of apple treats that humans usually have – like apple pies. The bottom line is that apple in small doses can have some health benefits, especially if given as an alternative to unhealthy high-fat pet treats.

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22. Peas

Perhaps you love eating fresh peas straight from the pod, and you’ve wondered if they are safe for your cat. Peas contain vitamins C, K, and B1 and minerals such as iron, copper, and potassium. As a starchy food that’s high in fiber, they may help if your cat suffers from constipation. You may have noticed that some cat foods contain peas in their list of ingredients, usually because of their fiber content. It is good to pay attention to what is in your cat’s food but know that ingredients in your cat’s food are balanced their the diet.

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Cats enjoy fresh, frozen, or cooked peas. If the peas are frozen, make sure they are soft enough to chew without causing choking. Frozen peas may also leave your cat with an uncomfortable brain freeze while eating anything frozen, so it is best to defrost anything first. Fresh peas are better than those in a can as well, but in a pinch, you could give a canned pea to your cat as long as there is no added seasoning. If your cat has never eaten peas before, try mashing them in with food they enjoy, like salmon. Avoid seasoning the peas as it is better for your cat if they are plain with no added salt or spices.

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21. Turkey

Turkey is lean meat that cats love. It’s a good source of protein and is often found in many commercial cat foods that are low, mid, or high in price. Give your cat some turkey breast as a safe snack. Remove any skin, bone, and fat from a roasted turkey before giving it to your cat. The bones can splinter, and too much fat is just as bad for your cat as it is for you. A safer piece would be from the breast as it has lower fat content than other cuts. Turkey should be only given in small amounts and small pieces for your cat.

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The turkey’s organ meats, such as the liver, gizzards, or heart, offer great nutritional benefit as long as you cook them first. In summer, cook and freeze gizzards as a refreshing treat. Dehydrated gizzards are an excellent chewy snack that will help keep your cat’s teeth healthy. Once again, if you introduce new food to your cat, do it slowly in small amounts and see how their digestive system responds. Veterinarians suggest only a minimal amount of liver. It can lead to other complications and diseases in cats, so keep this in mind when feeding any other parts of a turkey to your cat.

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20. Beef

Beef is commonly used in commercial cat food. It’s an excellent source of protein, vitamins B, E, K, and D, as well as minerals like iron, selenium, and zinc. Never feed raw beef to your cat. Any meat in your cat’s foods, whether it is dry kibble or canned wet food, is fully cooked for them, so you’ll want to do that same. After it’s cooked, make sure you remove any gristle and drain off any fat and remove fat. Leaner beef is better for them, and you should cut it into small pieces that are easy to chew.

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Extra-lean ground beef is another good source of protein for your cat. If you’re cooking ground beef and you want to share, make sure to set some aside for your cat before you season it. Your cat will enjoy the natural flavor, and you need to avoid spices that may upset the stomach or cause a bad reaction. One or two ounces of ground beef make a great snack. If you have a larger amount, you can always freeze it and serve it another day. Make sure you freeze the unseasoned meat and not the recipe that your meat is in.

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19. Spinach

When discussing whether spinach is suitable for cats, the answer is a little more complicated than a simple yes or no. Spinach is packed with vitamins and minerals, so some commercial cat foods feature spinach in the ingredients. Sometimes it is just the nutrients from the spinach that are actually in the food. It contains iron, calcium, and vitamins A, C, and K. It also includes glycolycerolipids, which help protect the digestive tract’s lining from damage caused by inflammation. Leafy greens should be a staple in our diet, but certain diseases in cats or health issues make this leafy green a no-no.

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If your cat has kidney or urinary problems, don’t feed it spinach. It contains calcium oxalates, which can contribute to crystals forming in the urinary tract. Your cat needs to be on a stricter diet when they have crystals, so make sure to talk to your veterinarian about this on your next visit. Add spinach to some scrambled eggs to entice your cat to eat it – it’s just as yummy for your cat as it is for you. Add spinach to food your cat already eats. It helps introduce the spinach. Just do not add any seasonings, toppings, or sauces.

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18. Pumpkin

Pumpkin is a healthy snack for cats, containing nutrients such as vitamins A, C, E, iron, calcium, and lutein. It is an excellent source of soluble fiber, and if your cat is suffering from diarrhea, it can absorb the excess water in the digestive tract and relieve diarrhea. Conversely, the high insoluble fiber content can help sort out constipation problems by creating bulk that stimulates bowel movements. That may also contribute to sort out hairballs in cats, which can be an issue for long-haired cat breeds. You can tell what the problem is in their litter box by looking at their stool – it is not the most pleasant job, but it will help you know what is going on inside your cat.

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Fully cooked, plain, mashed pumpkin is best, and an adult cat only needs a teaspoon or less a day. Don’t feed your cat raw pumpkin or the soft, pip-filled center. Avoid pumpkin with spices, additives, sugar, or fillers. You can provide your cat a small number of fresh pumpkin seeds, but you must clean and roast them at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for an hour first and do not add any salt or spices. That also means no pumpkin pie pieces or other deserts with pumpkin in them; it will need to be a fresh pumpkin cooked or canned fully cooked pumpkin.

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17. Blueberries

Blueberries are an excellent source of vitamins A and C. They are also full of antioxidants, supporting the immune system and helping the body defend itself against disease and illness. They are low in fats and calories, have a fair amount of fiber, and lower sugar than many other fruits. Some cat food manufacturers incorporate blueberries or blueberry powder into their cat foods for these nutritional benefits. Blueberries are not superfoods for cats like they are for humans, but they are still a great treat you can give your cat if you are also enjoying some blueberries at home.

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Cats can’t taste sweet flavors, but they are known to love trying new textures and tastes. They like wet treats, so your cat may very well enjoy trying out a mashed, whole, or frozen blueberry. Many felines love frozen blueberries, and they are small enough to make a safe treat and offer beneficial fiber and water at the same time. Feed your cat just two to three blueberries at a time as too many can cause digestive issues. Also, supervise your cat when you give them a new food to try as well, especially if it is a frozen treat.

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16. Whole grains

Allergies to grains are rare in cats, and it shouldn’t be necessary to feed your cat “grain-free” pet food. Common grains found in commercial cat food include rice, wheat, and corn. Of course, some pet foods contain cheap fillers, which are unhealthy, and you should avoid these. Cats can eat whole-grain snacks such as corn or polenta. They like the texture of coarsely ground cornmeal and tend to prefer smaller grains like couscous and millet. Most grain is also reasonably cheap, so if you wanted to try this snack out with your cat, it wouldn’t break the bank. It is more cost-effective than meat or fruit.

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Cook all grains before feeding them to your cat so they are easier to digest, and you may find that your cat prefers them when they are well mashed. Their diets should consist mostly of protein, rather than overdoing the grains, but a little grain is unlikely to harm them. It does contain some valuable nutrients, including vitamins, minerals, fiber, and essential fatty acids. You could try to mix in some grains with your cat’s dry kibble to give them a sort of “wet” food treats without actually getting wet food. It should not be done often, so keep that in mind.

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15. Cantaloupe

If you’re enjoying some cantaloupe, your cat may be curious enough to try some, too. Cats seem to be attracted to cantaloupe, and one of the reasons could be the smell – many of the same amino acids in meat are found in melons in much smaller quantities. If you have a cat that seems to be a cantaloupe-lover, don’t worry – he or she can have a bite or two on occasion. It is packed with beta-carotene for healthy eyes and skin and is full of antioxidants to boost the immune system. Cantaloupe is great for your own diet and your cats.

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Freeze a piece or two for a cool treat, mash it up, or cut up a few pieces, but avoid giving more than this as it could cause gastrointestinal upset. It also contains quite a bit of sugar, and you don’t want your cat to put on weight and suffer from health problems. That should be a once in a while treat, just when you happen to have some cantaloupe as well. As far as treats go, there are better options calorie-wise for cats that align better with their natural diet. So for cantaloupe, it is best to make this a more rare treat than some other options.

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14. Fish oil

Oily fish are a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids, and humans often supplement their diets with fish oil. These oils can lower blood pressure and lessen the risk of a heart attack. Do these oils have any benefit for cats? Healthy cats that eat a high-quality, well-balanced diet are unlikely to be lacking fatty acids. If your cat is young and healthy, fish oil is unnecessary, but supplemental fish oil may benefit if a cat is unwell or older. It can help cats who are older with heart diseases and is a good part of an overall balanced diet.

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Various studies have shown that older cats whose diets are supplemented with fish oil appear to be subject to fewer heart attacks and strokes, and it also seems to help improve the prognosis of cats with kidney disease. Everyday use of fish oil in cats helps prevent dry skin and keep a cat’s coat healthy. Add fish oil to any of the food your cat eats typically or to snacks you share. Along with helping your cats coat – it can also help their skin if it is dry, which could also be a sign of allergies.

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13. Broccoli

It may be an unlikely scenario that your cat would sniff the broccoli on your dinner plate and want to try it. However, for those who want to know if it is safe for your cat to eat – the answer is yes. Some cats enjoy eating plants when they need the roughage – perhaps they have a hairball they need to get rid of. It means that your cat is trying to throw up the hairball, and some plants or foods will help them do that. If you notice your cat eating your houseplants, keep them away because they may be poisonous, and give them some broccoli instead.

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Broccoli is full of fiber and is a great source of antioxidants that contains vitamin C and K. The vitamin K in broccoli improves calcium absorption and enhances bone health. Wash the broccoli thoroughly and cook it until it’s easily digestible. Once again, introduce it slowly, a little bit at a time, to see how your cat’s stomach responds. It is best to start with only 2 or 3 pieces the size of kibbles for your cat. You could even put the pieces in their food bowl with the kibble to encourage them to try the broccoli.

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12. Meat-based baby food (onion and garlic free)

Meat-based baby food is a good option if your cat is recovering from an illness and does not have much of an appetite. A cat that has had a tooth removed or any oral surgery will probably benefit from being fed baby food as well. It’s essential to check the ingredient list for onion or garlic before feeding baby food to your cat, as these ingredients are dangerous for cats. Having an option that is already blended for your cat will also benefit you, saving you time in the kitchen when it comes to your cat’s food.

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Don’t feed your cat baby food instead of cat food all the time, but only when you feel it may help them to eat rather than not eating at all. It is easy to freeze any extra baby food into ice cubes to make convenient treats. Most baby foods are conveniently plain, low in fat, and can be a good protein source. Make sure to read the labels of these baby foods, too, so that you know what you’re feeding your cat. Pay attention to expiry dates on the baby food and mark on any products you freeze, so you know when, or if, you need to throw them away.

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11. Carrots

While cats, unlike humans, don’t need veggies, they are safe for them. Beta-carotene, an antioxidant, gives carrots their orange color. Digestion turns beta-carotene into vitamin A. Carrots also contain vitamins E and K, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, manganese, folate, zinc, and fiber. Carrots are safe to give to cats but should be washed, peeled, and cooked before serving your feline friend. That is an excellent option for a treat once in a while for your cat. It tends to be a cheaper vegetable as well. So while you are chopping up carrots for your next meal, don’t forget to chop some for the cat!

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You can feed your cat carrots without the risk of poisoning them, and they are not likely to cause allergic reactions. However, carrots do not contain protein, and substituting a meaty meal with carrots is not a good idea. Instead, give your cat some good quality beef with some cooked, mashed carrot on the side. Baked, steamed, or boiled carrots are fine but don’t feed your cat raw carrot as it may be a choking hazard and is hard to digest. Carrots are a good substitute for bad fatty foods if you are worried about your cat’s weight or gaining weight.

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10. Milk

Kittens drink their mother’s milk, but after they are weaned, they lose their ability to digest milk. It’s a common misconception that milk is a necessary part of cat nutrition. Many cats have upset stomachs or other problems when given a milk bowl to drink as a treat. There are specially formulated cat milk products you can give to your pet, but they can be quite fattening if offered regularly. A solid-food diet has to be adjusted to account for the calories in this milk to avoid weight gain, which can be time-consuming to calculate and monitor.

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Giving your cat a lick or two of milk as a treat now and then is unlikely to do any harm. It should be a very occasional high-calorie treat rather than daily food. Too many calories from milk could prevent your cat from getting essential nutrients from its main diet. Make sure it is just milk that you are giving them if you decide to give it to them – the cereal milk in the bottom of the bowl is not a good idea as there will be tons of added sugar and bits of cereal leftover. Just plain milk will be a good enough treat for your cat – even if it just is a tiny amount.

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9. Asparagus

For humans, asparagus is a delicious, nutritious, low-calorie food. It contains fiber, a range of vitamins, and is a good source of potassium, which is beneficial for blood pressure and heart health. If your cat is eating your houseplants, he probably needs some roughage or fiber. Asparagus is a good source of fiber for your pet and is not dangerous or toxic for your cat in small amounts. If you are giving asparagus to your cat, make sure it does not replace their usual meaty main course – asparagus should be looked at as a treat and given in small portions.

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Too much asparagus can lead to urinary tract problems because its high alkalinity can adversely affect the urine’s chemical composition. If you choose to give your cat some asparagus, make sure it’s washed and boiled, steamed, or grilled. The asparagus must also be free of salt and other seasonings. Cooked and in tiny portions, your cat may eat asparagus, but it should never constitute a substantial part of the food it eats regularly. Make sure to cut the asparagus into tiny pieces to avoid choking, and always supervise your cats when giving them a new food to try.

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8. Game meats

Those who want to feed their cats a raw meat diet will often use game meats to try and replicate the natural diet as closely as possible. If a cat suffers from an allergic reaction to common meats, game meats may be the answer your looking for. Game meats such as duck, rabbit, and venison contain less fat than commercially raised animals. Meats from each animal also have different nutrient content, so feeding numerous meats from various sources can give your pet a full range of nutrients. If you are a hunter, you could get this meat for your cat in season and freeze it.

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If you have access to game meats, chop them up finely or run them through a grinder before feeding them to your cat. Feeding raw meat to cats is controversial. Some people believe it is dangerous due to the pathogens that are usually killed when food is cooked. Others think a raw-food diet for cats is the best option. Whatever you choose to do, make sure you do your own extensive research and do what is best for your cat – also ask for advice from your cat’s veterinarian. They will have the best advice for you as they are trained professionals.

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7. Sardines

There is no more stereotypical sight than a happy cat with a fish. So, what is the truth about fish and cats? Sardines can make a tasty reward for a cat that they will love from when they first smell them. Canned or tinned sardines are a good source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids for your feline friends. Sardines don’t live long enough to store toxins in their bodies, like some other large fish. That makes sardines much safer for your cat than different types of fish you can catch or buy. Usually, sardines are cheaper than other fish as well.

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If the sardines are canned in sunflower oil, drain off the oil before giving it to your cat. Don’t feed your pet sardines in tomato sauce. If you happen to have a food dehydrator, you can even dehydrate a batch of sardines and chop or slice them into tiny pieces for treats. Sardines should only form a small part of a healthy cat’s diet. Some canned sardines also have much salt, so make sure you read the labels and pay attention to what is actually in the can.

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6. Chicken broth

It can be a challenge to get your kitty to consume enough water. Many cats do not drink much water and are fussy about how you offer it to them. Adding some low-sodium chicken broth to food will increase water consumption and provide a low-calorie treat. If your cat has bladder stones, increasing water consumption is very important. If your cat is fussy about water, try both cool and warm with the chicken broth. Make sure there is always water available as well, even if you are adding chicken broth to their diet too. Do not take the water dish away!

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It is best to give your cat homemade chicken broth because commercially available broths usually contain much sodium and contain toxic spices to cats. Salt can disrupt their electrolyte balance. All you need to do to make the broth is cover the chicken with water in a large pot. Cook the chicken meat and get rid of the bones. Chicken broth can ensure that a cat remains hydrated, even when it has an upset stomach. It can also help them recover from an illness, as being hydrated is vital in any cat’s recovery.

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5. Nutritional yeast

Nutritional yeast is grown under controlled conditions. It is no longer active because it is treated with heat. Vegetarians often use nutritional yeast, which has a slightly cheesy or nutty taste. It’s very rich in vitamins and protein and may be used as a topping for popcorn or a flavor enhancer. It can also contribute to your cat’s healthy coat. Even though it is a vegan product, nutritional yeast has a lot of protein, which can benefit your cat’s diet as well. There is also a chance that nutritional yeast can help your cat become less prone to fleas.

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Nutritional yeast is usually sold in the form of yellow powder or flakes in natural food stores. You can also find it online very easily. It is very different from the live yeast used for baking that is toxic for your cat. Nutritional yeast can be used to try and get finicky cats to eat. Try sprinkling less than a teaspoon on your cat’s food to see the response, and give it a quick stir. Some cats enjoy the taste. Others do not. If your cat likes cheese, there is a good chance adding nutritional yeast will make them eat their regular food. Start with a minimal amount and gradually add more as your cat gets used to it.

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4. Yogurt

Yogurt is high in protein and calcium, which are beneficial to cats and humans. Calcium helps to strengthen bones. It’s safe for your cat to digest yogurt, but only if it’s plain, low-fat, and unsweetened. Avoid yogurt that contains sugar or artificial sweeteners. It is easier for cats to digest yogurt than other dairy products. That is because yogurt contains live bacteria cultures that break down lactose into lactic acid. Most cats are lactose intolerant, and some are even allergic to yogurt and dairy products. Make sure you supervise your cats eating this snack as a bad reaction could occur.

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If your cat has never eaten yogurt, try feeding them a small teaspoon at first. You can use plain yogurt to help a cat with an upset stomach or deal with antibiotics, but it also makes a good treat. Freeze yogurt into cubes for a cool treat on a hot summer day. It should be a treat that is only given on occasion. If your cat has bladder stones, the added calcium in yogurt can contribute to stones’ formation, so it’s better to avoid it. If your cat has also had a bad reaction to other dairy products, it would be best to avoid yogurt as well.

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3. Chicken feet

Chicken feet are widely eaten in Asia. Cats love their crunchy texture, and they help to keep their teeth clean. Chicken feet can be dehydrated in certain pet stores or fresh at some butcher shops or in Asian supermarkets. You can also find some of these treats online, though you shouldn’t buy fresh online if it needs to be shipped and isn’t local. Many cats love the taste of a dehydrated chicken foot, but some are pickier than others, so try out a tiny amount at first. You could put the small pieces into their dry or wet food to encourage them to try it.

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If you’re feeding raw chicken feet, make sure the nails are cut off and the feet have been thoroughly cleaned in very hot water. As with anything containing bone, there is some risk of damage to the digestive tract, so cut the feet into tiny pieces. Raw meats may have some serious pathogens, so don’t feed chicken feet to young kittens or older cats, especially those taking immunosuppressive drugs. If you are unsure whether it is best to give your cat raw or cooked chicken feet, make sure you consult with your veterinarian before giving them to your cat.

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2. Dehydrated liver

Dehydrated food is rising in popularity because it offers many of the same advantages as raw food but in a way that’s easier for pet owners to handle. The dehydrated liver is a good source of protein that your cat will love. This nutrient-rich organ meat is also a good source of vitamins A and D, iron, zinc, and omega-3 fatty acids. Most pet stores will carry treats with dehydrated liver and other meats, so if you’re looking for a convenient and easy snack, make sure to ask your pet store clerk about them. You should also be able to find them online. Just do your research before purchasing.

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Cats need meat, but you should only feed your pet dehydrated liver as an occasional treat. If you overdo these treats, you will do more harm than good. Overeating the liver can cause vitamin A toxicity. That is serious because it can cause deformed bones, osteoporosis, and bone growth on the spine or elbows. As with other treats – this should not replace part of your cat’s diet but should be an additional small portion. These are treats, after all, not meals. Make sure to break up any larger pieces of dehydrated liver into pieces about the size of kibbles for your cats to enjoy.

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1. Bacon

Bacon puts a smile on many human faces at breakfast time. You may want to know whether it’s safe to feed your cat some of your bacon. It is safe for your kitty to have a little piece of your bacon, but don’t make it a regular habit. One of the biggest concerns is that bacon contains plenty of salt and fat, which can be very unhealthy for your poor cat. If you are going to give your cat a piece of bacon, try to cut off some of the fat, so it is a little better for them. 

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Well-cooked bite-sized pieces of bacon can make an occasional delicious treat for your cat, but sharing your bacon with your cat daily is a mistake. It could result in obesity, high blood pressure, clogged arteries, and even salt poisoning. If you can restrict yourself to sharing a small bite now and then, your cat will love it and not suffer any dire consequences as a result. If you have seasoned your bacon with salt or pepper, or if it is sweet bacon with a maple flavor, it is best to skip giving it to your cat.

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