Health

Signs that Someone May be Suffering From Osteoporosis

4. Osteoporosis can affect children, too.  Idiopathic Juvenile Osteoporosis, or IJO, is a primary condition with no known cause. Doctors use this diagnosis after they exclude… Trista - June 30, 2021
Credit: Shutterstock

4. Osteoporosis can affect children, too. 

Idiopathic Juvenile Osteoporosis, or IJO, is a primary condition with no known cause. Doctors use this diagnosis after they exclude other causes of juvenile osteoporosis. That includes primary diseases or medical therapies known to cause bone loss. This rare form of osteoporosis typically occurs in children who were previously healthy just before the onset of puberty. It happens around 7 with a range of 1 to 13 years. Fortunately, most children experience a complete recovery of bone loss.

Credit: Shutterstock

The first symptom of IJO is usually pain that occurs in the lower back, hips, and feet. This pain is often accompanied by difficulty walking. There may also be knee and ankle pain and fractures of the lower extremities. There may also be some physical malformations present, such as loss of height, a sunken chest, abnormal curvature of the upper spine, kyphosis, or a limp. If you notice your child is experiencing any one or more of these symptoms, you must tell their doctor right away so they can start treatment if necessary.

Credit: Shutterstock

3. There’s more to know about Idiopathic Juvenile Osteoporosis. 

After the IJO has run its course, the physical malformations are sometimes reversible. There is no medical or surgical therapy for juvenile osteoporosis. However, there may be no need for treatment because the condition usually goes away spontaneously in some cases. Early diagnosis is still important, though. That way, you can take steps to protect the child’s spine and other bones from fracture and breakage until they are in remission. Doctors may recommend some physical therapy. Other things might include using crutches, avoiding dangerous weight-bearing activities, as well as other supportive care.

Credit: Shutterstock

A well-balanced diet rich in vitamin D and calcium is also vital for children. In severe, long-lasting cases of juvenile osteoporosis, doctors gave children some medications called bisphosphonates experimentally. Today, experts approve them for the treatment of adults with osteoporosis. However, most children experience a complete recovery of the bone tissue lost. Although you have impaired growth during the acute phase of the disorder, normal growth resumes, and afterward, catch-up growth often occurs. Unfortunately, in some severe cases, IJO can result in a permanent disability, such as a collapse of the upper spine’s rib cage or curvature.

Credit: Shutterstock

2. Medications to help treat osteoporosis can come with side effects of their own. 

Depending on an individual’s situation, a doctor will recommend specific treatments to help treat their osteoporosis. Treatments for osteoporosis are taken to help reduce the risk of fractured or broken bones and are becoming increasingly prescribed for people with a high risk of fracture or bone breakage. Although these medications may reduce the risk of broken bones in people with osteoporosis, those same medications can also cause side effects in some people. However, these side effects would depend on a lot of different factors.

Credit: Shutterstock

Some of the bisphosphonate tablets can cause inflammation to the food pipe, known as the oesophagus. Also, you can experience a sore throat, swallowing difficulties, chest pain, and musculoskeletal pain. Sometimes injectable bisphosphonates cause flu-like symptoms for a few days. Raloxifene, or evista and strontium ranelate, or protelos can slightly increase the risk of blood clots. To help reduce the risk of side effects with these medications, there are strict instructions regarding how the bisphosphonate tablets are to be taken. Furthermore, it is vital to follow strict instructions. 

Credit: Shutterstock

1. Doctors are continually developing new treatments. 

Scientists are continually developing new treatments that would help treat osteoporosis, and many are currently undergoing testing. Some of those treatments include anti-RANK ligand antibodies, such as denosumab. They affect bone breakdown by inhibiting a local hormone called RANK ligand, which affects the control of bone turnover. There is other research, which is examining growth hormones, and the role played by genes, and existing drugs are also being updated and improved. For example, Ibandronate or Bonviva is available as an intravenous injection, but it’s also available in a tablet.

Credit: Shutterstock

Many doctors will know about new treatments that are becoming more available to the public. If you want to know about something new, or have any questions about the one you may have already heard about, ask your doctor. They may have some suggestions on what to try to help treat your osteoporosis. Who knows, you might be able to help out with research in the future. Sometimes patients are asked to help participate in studies to help find new treatments that work best for others with similar illnesses as yourself. 

Advertisement