Health

25 Reasons Why You Are Constantly Feeling Fatigued

6. Stress Those who experience stress regularly may notice that they feel exhausted after a particularly stressful situation. They want nothing more than to go to bed and… Trista - April 7, 2022
Shutterstock

6. Stress

Those who experience stress regularly may notice that they feel exhausted after a particularly stressful situation. They want nothing more than to go to bed and close their eyes. That isn’t a defense mechanism to get away from the stress; it is a biological response to what the body is doing. During stress, the body releases cortisol, a stress hormone, which flows through the rest of the body. Elevated cortisol levels can then lead to decreased energy and interfere with sleep.

Stress is the number one cause of insomnia, a widespread sleeping disorder. That is because cortisol puts the body in a heightened state that takes a while to recover from, affecting the other brain chemicals needed for the body to function normally. Furthermore, because stress is more likely to lead to insomnia, the lack of sleep further exacerbates the fatigue a person can experience.

Shutterstock

5. Pregnancy

One important reason you could start feeling fatigued is that you might be in the early stages of pregnancy. Symptoms can show up before you’ve even taken a pregnancy test, and that’s because your body is already going through the hormonal and physical changes that come with being pregnant. Other than a missed period, one of the prominent symptoms is being extremely tired. Why? Because the body goes into overdrive to maintain the pregnancy and start developing milk-producing glands in the breasts for the future.

Some women have even experienced severe exhaustion as early as one week after conception, making it one of the first noticeable signs of pregnancy. Remember that fatigue could also be a symptom of a hormonal imbalance that has nothing to do with being pregnant. If you suspect either of these conditions, you should seek the advice of a medical professional as soon as possible. That way, you know what to prepare for in the future.

Shutterstock

4. Diabetes

Did you know that exhaustion could be a symptom of diabetes? There are two types of diabetes: one where blood sugar is too high and one where blood sugar is too low. In each extreme, you’re going to experience lethargy. Why? Because there is an imbalance between the blood glucose levels and how much insulin is circulating throughout the body. Knowing your blood glucose levels could help you better maintain it through diet and exercise.

A person feels tired when too much sugar is present in the blood. Why? Because there is not enough insulin to process it and bring it to the cells as energy, or the insulin is not working effectively enough. That is why you will feel tired. When it comes to low blood sugar levels, the body has run out of fuel, so like a car without gas, the body will feel tired. You need to monitor blood sugar levels closely to determine what remedies can help prevent fatigue.

Shutterstock

3. Depression

Anyone who has had a major depressive episode can tell you that they feel fatigued regularly. That is because depression interferes with both the physical and mental functioning of the body as a whole. Depression can cause severe fatigue and make even the most basic tasks feel nigh impossible. The best means of determining whether you have severe depression is you schedule a physical exam with your primary care doctor to see whether your severe fatigue is related to your depression.

According to a study published in Psychiatry Research, 90% of depressed patients participating in the survey reported severe fatigue, making it a prevalent symptom. The worst part is that 81% of those patients were already on antidepressants, which can further increase the fatigue symptom. If you fear that you may have severe depression, speak to your primary care physician immediately and see if you can get help in treating your depression, especially if one of your symptoms is extreme fatigue.

Shutterstock

2. Being Overweight or Underweight

There is no such thing as the perfect body; everyone is different in their own way, and trying to meet a certain standard in terms of weight or looks isn’t going to make you more healthy. However, being overweight or underweight can impact levels of fatigue. That isn’t to say that you have to meticulously meet some magic weight number to be cured; instead, you should strive to be a healthy weight that doesn’t cause fatigue.

Being overweight can increase conditions such as fatigue because it also increases the risks of diabetes and sleep apnea. Carrying more weight than your body can handle leads to more joint and muscle pain, making fatigue worse. Being underweight can also lead to fatigue because there is not enough fuel for the body to function. It could be due to eating disorders, cancer, an overactive thyroid, or other chronic diseases that can cause dramatic weight loss.

Shutterstock

1. Poor Nutrition

Eating right can play a big part in your energy levels, which means having a nutritionally-sound diet. Just as if you put the wrong kind of fuel in your car, if you eat the wrong type of food, it will stop working properly, which can leave you feeling more tired than you should. Fried foods, processed grains, and foods with a lot of added sugar will overload your body with more calories than they need, forcing it to work overtime to break down these foods and leaving you feeling tired in the process.

Having too much caffeine and alcohol in your diet is also bad for energy levels because they interrupt your natural waking cycle. Invest your time in healthier foods that aren’t fried and have more dietary fiber to get your metabolic rates back in balance. Simple adjustments to your diet can provide you with a surprising boost to your energy levels and allow you to get more done during your day.

Advertisement