Health

Warning Signs of Anxiety in Kids

Your child could be suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Another problem that may first arise from a stomach ache is Irritable Bowel Syndrome. IBS is a… Trista - September 25, 2019
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Your child could be suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Another problem that may first arise from a stomach ache is Irritable Bowel Syndrome. IBS is a disorder accompanied by a host of issues, including abdominal pain, cramping, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, and gas. There is no known cause, but some experts suggest that those with the condition have a more sensitive and reactive colon that responds to certain foods with stress. It is also referred to as a spastic colon.

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Experts state that those with IBS frequently suffer from anxiety and depression. The colon is partially controlled by the nervous system, which is responsive to stress and other things that could cause negative feelings. Anxiety is the body’s response to stress, and children with IBS may be having very physical reactions because they are concerned about the things going on around them.

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Your child’s muscles can tighten.

Because the natural reaction in survival mode is to fight or flight, children dealing with anxiety may feel their muscles tighten when they are under an anxiety attack. Different areas can be affected. Some may be felt in their neck, chest, jaw, or stomach. There are no specific target areas. It depends on where the brain sends the distressing signals.

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Your child may not know what is happening whenever they are feeling the muscles tighten up. You can console them and try to get them calm until the episode subsides. Please note how frequently they complain about the tightened muscles and consult with your child’s doctor for a follow-up visit. There is much more to learn about what to watch for. You can find out more about anxiety signs in children by reading on.

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Your child will complain of itchy skin.

Some anxiety orders cause children to have itchy skin. Several itchy skin conditions can also lead to anxiety, creating a situation where one scenario exacerbates the other. It may be treatable, but it is still something that should be checked out to determine how they may be connected and what could be an appropriate treatment. Your child’s scratching or picking at the skin could be a sign of anxiety.

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We also previously discussed the repetitive bodily actions that some children may exhibit. The picking of skin could have started as a way to seek release from the uncomfortable sensations. Keep reading to learn more about signs of anxiety in children. If you notice one or more of these symptoms in your kid, don’t worry. You can reach out to your doctor to learn more about how you can cope with stress. Furthermore, how you can teach your children to deal with anxiety.

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The heart rate will become elevated.

When the heart pumps extra fast, the body is triggered to work harder to get the blood flow to the other areas. A fast heart rate is expected in children as it responds to increased exercise levels or other activities. However, anxiety can be a whole different story. The condition could manifest its fight or flight tendencies to the heart’s productivity. That could spell out big problems if it becomes chronic.

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If your child is complaining about chest pains or trouble breathing along with an overworking heart rate, you may need to ensure that they see immediate medical attention. Their heart may be beating too fast. One good rule to follow is that if the child’s heart is beating too fast to count the number of beats it is producing, you should go to the hospital as soon as possible. There are several other signs to know. Keep reading to find out more.

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The ears may be pulsing.

Just like stomach pains, earache is another common condition that many children have. However, there is a difference between pain and hearing something that may not be there. Tinnitus is a condition where your child would listen to pulsing or a whooshing sound. Stress causes the secretion of hormones by the body and blood circulation, which leads to less oxygen intake in the inner ear.

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Stress does not cause the condition to appear; however, it can, over time, generate more health problems for your child. Physical changes from anxiety-induced stress could even trigger hearing loss and other inner ear problems. Hearing is such a meaningful sense. Contact your child’s primary care pediatrician if you believe your child is experiencing this symptom. There are techniques you can learn and apply when feeling stressed.

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Your child may have shortness of breath.

Getting winded is a normal occurrence when it is after an intense exercise or playtime. However, anything short of that can be immediately alarming. Another alarming symptom of an anxiety attack is shortness of breath. It often coincides with other symptoms such as elevated heart rate, and immediate medical attention may be needed to get the sign under control.

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Trouble breathing is something that you could notice right away, and it might be the result of another medical problem, such as asthma. Anxiety is indeed something that most adults and children can feel from time to time. It may be part of normal learning, growth, and development. It becomes a concern when it is consistently disrupting your child’s health and social life. We all want what is best for our kids.

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Your child may be feeling an electric shock sensation.

Electric shock feelings are often called phantom vibrations, where the brain shivers or zaps. The feelings are like sensing a phone vibrate only to discover that nothing happened or a buzzing sensation. It could also be terrifying at the moment, and your child may not know what to do when it happens. These phantom vibrations could be caused by attachment anxiety.

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If you believe that your child’s constant concerns and fears are out of the ordinary and the disruption is negatively impacting how he or she is growing, you should share those statements with your child’s doctor. Monitoring the symptoms is essential. You could need the child psychologist or counselor’s help to handle your child’s difficult physical and emotional feelings.

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Your child may constantly feel dizzy.

Feeling dizzy in the short term can be a bit of fun, especially if it is the result of spinning around too many times. It makes your child fall. However, in an uncontrolled setting, it can be scary. Children with anxiety may complain about feeling dizzy for seemingly no reason. The physical symptom could be related to an anxiety disorder as the body responds to other responses from within.

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Experts believe that constant dizziness is due to the brain areas that are responsible for the dizziness feeling interacting with the child’s other anxiety-induced symptoms. Feeling dizzy is often described as a light-headed or wooziness sensation. Does your child ever stand up and just stay there for a second? Maybe they stare off If this and other symptoms are happening consistently, you should make an appointment with a doctor.

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Your child is not eating correctly.

We have talked about other areas that children and adults try to control their unwanted feelings of anxiety. Food intake is another one. However, there may be a related physical reason why your child does not want to eat. Lack of an appetite and a decrease in food a child eats could be a sign that he or she is feeling anxious. Do you notice this habit in your children? Try to pay closer attention if you think this is happening.

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There is loss in appetite might be because of the hormonal changes that are occurring within the body. The other physical symptoms of anxiety could be another reason why your child is pushing back the plate of food and wanting to be left alone until the feelings subside. Because nutrition is so vital for development, contact the doctor for assistance if you believe this is happening to your children.

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Your child may be short-tempered.

Because anxiety may be the culprit behind a host of other problems, you may notice that your once sweet-tempered child may have become a bit of a hothead. Those with anxiety often have trouble falling asleep or staying in slumber. Sleep-deprived children may become more sensitive to small setbacks and problems. In turn, they are irritable and quick to anger.

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Experts believe that anxiety and short tempers go hand in hand with feelings of loss of control. Children with anxiety are being presented with a stressor that they do not know how to handle. These frustrated feelings could then present themselves as anger. Emotions are a tough thing to tackle. Call your children’s pediatrician if you are feeling concerned that your constant crabby child may have anxiety.

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