Health

15 Best Ways to Avoid Period Cramps and Survive That Time of the Month

15. Take a safe painkiller Although many of us would like to avoid taking medication, sometimes it’s necessary. If none of the above methods work for… Simi - May 7, 2018

15. Take a safe painkiller

Although many of us would like to avoid taking medication, sometimes it’s necessary. If none of the above methods work for you, you might like to consider taking a safe painkiller to cut the inflammation and relieve pain. You can try a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) like Advil, Motrin IB or others (ibuprofen) or naproxen sodium (Aleve). The way these drugs work is to reduce the number of prostaglandins that are produced. Prostaglandins are the cause of menstrual cramps and inflammation. Prescription NSAIDs are also available, including mefenamic acid (Ponstel).

Before taking any drugs, talk to your doctor to see if NSAIDs are suitable for you. If you have a history of kidney problems or of bleeding, they might not be a good choice for you. There are other pain relievers on the market which might be better suited to you.

Always read the label on the package, as well as the dosing instruction leaflet to make sure that you don’t take too many painkillers. Overdosing on painkillers can be extremely dangerous and harmful to various systems of the body. For example, too much ibuprofen can damage your gastrointestinal system. It is advisable to use the minimum dose to get relief from your pain. The maximum dosage of ibuprofen for adults is four doses of 800 mg per day. Do not exceed this amount.

Begin taking the medication the day before you expect your period to start. If your period catches you unawares, start taking the medication as soon as you begin to experience symptoms. Keep taking it as directed for 2 or 3 days, or until your symptoms have disappeared. If you can’t take NSAIDs for whatever reason, there are other pain relievers available such as acetaminophen (Tylenol and others). Ask your doctor for advice.

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