Featured

A Junk Food Diet Can Change the Brain in a Week

27. Get quality carbs and healthy fats For carbohydrates, look for whole grains, beans and legumes, starchy tubers (such as potatoes and sweet potatoes) and fruit.… Rina - April 27, 2020
a healthy brain. Shutterstock.

27. Get quality carbs and healthy fats

For carbohydrates, look for whole grains, beans and legumes, starchy tubers (such as potatoes and sweet potatoes) and fruit. The combination of resistant starch, fiber and water content will help you feel fuller, for longer. When it comes to carbohydrates, for most men we recommend 6-8 cupped handfuls of carbohydrates daily. And for most women, we recommend 4-6 cupped handfuls of carbohydrates daily. For fat-dense foods, look to high-quality oils and butter, nut butter, nuts/seeds, avocados, and even a little dark chocolate. Fat tends to be digested the most slowly of all the macronutrients, especially sources that are less energy-dense and higher in fiber (e.g. nuts, seeds, avocados).

For most men, itis recommended to have 6-8 thumb-sized portions of healthy fats per day. For most women, it is recommended to have 4-6 thumb-sized portions of healthy fats per day. Consider how you eat. Work on eating slowly. Pay attention to your own internal satiety cues. Eat without your smartphone, TV, or computer in your face. Eat from smaller plates. Create an environment in your home and workspace that makes it difficult to overeat or be tempted with highly-processed, highly-rewarding foods. Remember Berardi‘s First Law: If a food is in your house or possession, either you, someone you love, or someone you marginally tolerate will eventually eat it. This also leads to the corollary of Berardi’s First Law: If “a healthy food” is in your house or possession, either you, someone you love, or someone you marginally tolerate will eventually eat it.

ideas for a healthy brain. Shutterstock.

28. Be flexible.

Recognize that it’s OK to have some of those highly-rewarding foods. Completely avoiding them, or demonizing them as “bad” or “poison” usually does the opposite of what you want: You feel like a guilty failure, and you often end up overeating or bingeing on those “banned” foods. Instead, choose (in other words, decide in advance) to indulge in some occasional cookies, brownies or ice cream. Eat them slowly and mindfully, until you’re satisfied. Enjoy them. And then move on, back to your regular routine like it’s nothing. Keep in mind that how often you choose to indulge should depend on what you’re looking to achieve. Be aware

Cultivate an awareness of how you feel before, during and after your meals. Do you eat because you’re truly hungry, or because the clock says it’s time to eat, or because you just “feel snacky”? Do you feel overstuffed at the end of a meal, only to find yourself staring into the fridge two hours later? Where do most of your meals come from? Consider keeping a food journal for a couple of weeks, making note of what you eat and how you feel. You can also jot down stuff like what you’re thinking, and what else is going on in your life (e.g. stress at work). Simply becoming more aware of your body’s cues — and how these relate to other factors — will help you better regulate your food intake. Awareness helps you make decisions that are more in line with your body’s actual needs.

 

Where did we find this stuff? Here are our sources:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2805706/
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/321915249_The_impact_of_junk_foods_on_the_adolescent_brain
https://www.precisionnutrition.com/eating-too-much-blame-your-brain
https://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/eating-a-junk-food-diet-quickly-undermines-your-memory-and-selfcontrol/
https://www.researchgate.net/scientific-contributions/39797429_Richard_J_Stevenson

Advertisement